Available Online Courses

Click on the link to order course now!

Select a category to narrow your search:
v
View All Courses
Course Title 
Length (Hrs) 
Costs 
Category 
Course Link 
Bobtailing and Jackknifing 13022A0.525.00Canada Driver Safety TrainingLink
This video explains what 'Bobtailing' a tractor is and why it is dangerous. It also explains the basics of braking and the different ways braking can affect the trailer and cause it to 'Jackknife.'
Driver Safety Course for Large Trucks & Buses4.0160.00Canada Driver Safety TrainingLink
This course is made for drivers to improve their driving skills and learn something new about how large Trucks and Buses can interact on our roadways. The course is specifically designed for professional drivers of large commercial vehicles. Topics covered include Space Management, Passing and Lane Changing, Drug and Alcohol Effects on Traffic Safety, Trip Inspections, and more. This program will help professionals improve their skills and enhance their training to make them sharper, more aware drivers.
Forklift Safety - CA2.020.00Canada Driver Safety TrainingLink
This course is designed for private personnel who want to enhance the safe operation of powered industrial trucks in the workplace. Topics include an overview of safety standards for safe operation of industrial trucks.
1.0-A-Commercial HP Guidelines1.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
High performance buildings maximize operational energy savings; improve comfort, health, and safety of occupants and visitors; and limit detrimental effects on the environment. This 7-hour program provides instruction in the new methodologies that form the underpinnings of high performance commercial and municipal buildings. Coverage includes how these practices may be implemented within existing frameworks of municipal capital project administration and facility management. These Guidelines promote careful study of all stages in project development to ensure the fiscal integrity of the commercial project. They also encourage the formulation of responsible budgets at the planning stage. Further, they help the design team to identify any high performance cost premiums (together with cost savings) and to justify them to the Owner’s satisfaction.
2.0-A-Design Process1.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
The delivery of a high performance project calls for significantly increased collaboration among the various design disciplines. A focused goal-setting session should help develop a work plan for incorporating high performance objectives. The emphasis on interdisciplinary design and resource management, together with use of new design tools, distinguishes high performance from conventional processes.
3.1-A-Site Design and Planning1.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
Preservation of site resources and conservation of energy and materials – both during construction and in ongoing building operations – are important and often overlooked benefits of good site design. Sustainable site planning identifies ecological, infrastructural, and cultural characteristics of the site to assist designers in their efforts to integrate the building and the site. The intent is to encourage optimum use of natural/existing features in architectural and site design, such that building energy use is diminished and environmental degradation is minimized.
3.2-A-Building Energy Use0.070.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
Today’s world view of energy efficiency is very different from the energy conservation mentality of the 1970s, which is recalled by those of us who were around then as a time of long lines at the gas pumps and diminished comfort in our homes and places of work. The energy efficiency model of today involves benefits, not sacrifices. In high performance buildings, energy efficient design begins with a methodical reduction of the building’s heating and cooling loads – those imposed by climate and those generated by people and equipment. With all loads minimized, mechanical systems are then selected based on highest output for lowest fuel consumption.
3.3-A-Indoor Environment0.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
High performance buildings reflect a concern for the total quality of the interior environment. By definition, they provide supportive ambient conditions, including thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality, visual comfort, and appropriate acoustical quality. Air temperature, mean radiant temperature, air speed, and humidity are all factors that affect thermal comfort. Dissatisfaction with thermal conditions is the most common source of complaints in office buildings. Visual comfort is a function of many variables, including lighting quality (e.g., illuminant or intensity of light that impinges on a surface, the amount of glare, and the spectrum of the light), visual contact with the exterior, and availability of natural lighting. Acoustical quality is obtained through appropriate noise attenuation through the building envelope, control of equipment noise, and efforts to block flanking sound paths through fixed walls and floors, and to isolate plumbing noise. Increased attention to these environmental features can boost quality of life in the workplace by improving overall physiological and psychological well-being. By making the project team accountable for improving building interiors, the facility can achieve better human resource outcomes: avoidance of sick building syndrome, reduced occupant complaints, lower rates of absenteeism, improved occupant health, and potentially improved occupant performance.
3.4-A-Material and Product Selection0.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
Selecting materials and products for high performance buildings involves consideration of environmental and health issues in addition to more traditional criteria such as cost, durability, performance, and aesthetics. While methods for evaluating products based on these criteria are still evolving, the number of available building products with improved environmental and health characteristics have been steadily increasing. Markets are responding to meet the demands of government, businesses, and consumers who are increasingly aware of health and environmental concerns.
3.5-A-Water Management0.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
Plumbing systems have evolved from being a simple means of distributing water and collecting wastes into increasingly sophisticated systems that must also address environmental concerns. The design of a plumbing system must incorporate not only traditional issues of sanitation, flow, and pressure, but also environmentally based preferences for recycling waste water, use of non-utility water, and different treatments for potable and non-potable water. New technologies, responses to water efficiency concerns, and community-based water quality goals pose numerous challenges for 21st Century plumbing design. These challenges are often exacerbated by stresses induced by rapid development. “Non-utility” water refers to water not provided by the utility, such as rainwater and gray water.
3.6-A-Construction Administration0.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
Construction and demolition debris is the waste stream generated by new construction, by renovation, and by the demolition of existing buildings. Building construction and renovation activities alter the urban environment, generating noise, waste, and air pollution that can stress the building’s occupants and neighbors. High performance construction practices can help reduce adverse effects during construction while improving the building’s long-term environmental performance. In particular, construction and demolition (C&D) waste has become an increasing environmental and municipal burden, equaling up to 30% of the municipal solid waste stream. The majority of this waste is generally disposed of by private haulers engaged by demolition subcontractors and land-filled in or out of state, at increasing cost to taxpayers. The strategies that follow can reduce the amount of C&D waste generated at the start, and encourage better waste management methods through salvage and recycling.
3.7-A-Building Commissioning0.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
The commissioning process assures the building owner that the equipment, systems, and controls providing light, heat, cooling, and ventilation are effectively working together in conformance with design intent. Commissioning determines whether the systems need to be adjusted to improve efficiency, indoor air quality, and acoustic performances. The commissioning process encompasses–but also surpasses–the normal testing, adjusting, and balancing (TAB) activities commonly performed in inspections. Commissioning also involves comprehensive functional testing to determine how well mechanical and electrical systems work together. Because so many building systems are now integrated, a deficiency in one component can result in substandard operation and performance among other components. In general practice, a commissioning agent assists the construction team in substantively reducing and eliminating defects before the building is turned over to its occupants. Commissioning may also occur based on a partial system upgrade.
3.8-A-Operations and Maintenance0.035.00Commercial Green BuildingLink
Adequate planning for the efficient operation and maintenance of a building and its systems is a critical component of high performance design and construction. Design strategies that address operations and maintenance (O&M) issues can result in reduced custodial costs and lower energy consumption. Exposure to physical and chemical hazards, toxins, odors, and potential asthma ‘triggers’ can be reduced or eliminated. Efficient operation and maintenance also enhances the indoor environment and may contribute positively to user/occupant well-being and productivity. To achieve successful operations and maintenance, it is important to ensure that planned systems and strategies are consistent with the resources available to the client agency.
Confined Space Entry (C)1.020.00Confined Space Entry (C)Link
None
Confined Spaces & Permit Required Confined Spaces (GI)1.020.00Confined Space Entry (C)Link
None
Permit Required Confined Space Entry Training 8-Hour8.0159.00Confined Space Entry (C)Link
None
10 Hour Construction Safety Orientation10.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Effective Meeting2.050.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Equipment Utilization2.050.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Preplanning2.050.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Short Interval Planning (SIP)2.050.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Underlying Studies Building Construction2.085.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Underlying Studies for Heavy/Civil Construction2.085.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
AGC - Written Communication2.050.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Basic Safety Orientation1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Basic Safety Orientation for Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Cal-OSHA: Excavation Safety Training1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Concrete and Masonry Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Concrete and Masonry Safety Training1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Confined Space Entry Safety Training1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Confined Spaces & Permit Required Confined Spaces1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Cranes and Rigging in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Cranes and Rigging in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Electrical Safety in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Electrical Safety Training1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Excavation Safety in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Excavation Safety in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Fall Protection for Construction1.00.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Fall Protection Training1.00.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Fire Protection in the Workplace1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Fire Safety Training1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
FOCUS FOUR - Electrical Safety in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
FOCUS FOUR - Fall Protection in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
FOCUS FOUR - Struck-By and Caught-In Between Injury Prevention1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
General Safety & Health Provisions1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
General Safety and Health Provisions1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
GHS and OSHA Hazardous Communication1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Hand and Power Tool Safety in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Hand and Power Tools1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None
Hand and Power Tools in Construction1.020.00CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TRAININGLink
None